Oh Yeah, Developmental Biology!

RSS

Posts tagged with "science"

Embryon: Human Embryogenesis

embryonblog:

Hey everyone!

Our indiegogo campaign is launched.

Please share with anyone interested in science, medical art, embryology, dental, education, or anyone you think would like to see what we’re doing.

Thanks!

I start college in August, and I wanted to know if you have any tips for new biology majors?

Yes. Be prepared to study hard and party hard :D

9am lectures are the worst, so buy a Dictaphone as you will fall asleep at some point and trying to decipher sleep written notes at a later date will have you thinking you work at Bletchley Park. 

But on a more serious note, new scientist is a good place for general articles. Get you books second hand off various sites or on offers posted round uni. This will save you a fortune!! 

Join your biology (life science/whatever its called) society. 

Generally just be social and have fun :D science is fun after all :) 

I’m sure people will have more advice to add so check the notes.

Jul 2
Rainbow ‘bird’s nest’ MRI reveals how a heart beats

(Image: Laurence Jackson)
This is not a colourful bird’s nest: it is the collection of muscle fibres that work together to make a mouse heart beat.
The vivid MRI picture was captured using diffusion tensor imaging, which tracks the movement of fluid through tissue, using different colours to represent the orientation of the strands.
The fibres, which spiral around the left ventricular cavity, curve in different directions around the inside and outside walls of the chamber. When the fibres pull against one another, the result is an upwards twisting motion that forces blood to be pumped out.
The image, which was the overall winner of the Research Images as Artcompetition at University College London last year, is currently on display at the Summer Science Exhibition taking place at the Royal Society in London. It is part of an exhibit showcasing future imaging techniques that will allow us to peer inside the body.

Rainbow ‘bird’s nest’ MRI reveals how a heart beats

(Image: Laurence Jackson)

This is not a colourful bird’s nest: it is the collection of muscle fibres that work together to make a mouse heart beat.

The vivid MRI picture was captured using diffusion tensor imaging, which tracks the movement of fluid through tissue, using different colours to represent the orientation of the strands.

The fibres, which spiral around the left ventricular cavity, curve in different directions around the inside and outside walls of the chamber. When the fibres pull against one another, the result is an upwards twisting motion that forces blood to be pumped out.

The image, which was the overall winner of the Research Images as Artcompetition at University College London last year, is currently on display at the Summer Science Exhibition taking place at the Royal Society in London. It is part of an exhibit showcasing future imaging techniques that will allow us to peer inside the body.

forever—eli:

Embryology my favorite class ever😍

forever—eli:

Embryology my favorite class ever😍

This is a filtered confocal image of a stage1 Drosophila melanogaster egg chamber budding out of the germarium. The germarium is the assembly line for new egg chambers; it houses the germline stem cells which develop into mature egg chambers during oogenesis. The germarium, the budding stage 1 egg chamber, and the more mature stage 2 egg chamber were stained for mitochondria using an anti-ATPSythase antibody (green). Mitochondria are the powerhouse of the cell and provide the energy required for growth and maturation during oogenesis.

This is a filtered confocal image of a stage1 Drosophila melanogaster egg chamber budding out of the germarium. The germarium is the assembly line for new egg chambers; it houses the germline stem cells which develop into mature egg chambers during oogenesis. The germarium, the budding stage 1 egg chamber, and the more mature stage 2 egg chamber were stained for mitochondria using an anti-ATPSythase antibody (green). Mitochondria are the powerhouse of the cell and provide the energy required for growth and maturation during oogenesis.

Heart, heal thyself! No problem, says the zebrafish

(Image: BHF/Dr Jana Koth)image

The future of regenerative medicine is bright: in this case, literally. This image of a stained zebrafish heart glowing with multiple colours is one of the winners of the British Heart Foundation’s annual heart and blood vessel photography competition.

The green staining of the two-day-old heart highlights the cardiomyocytes, the cells of the heart muscle itself. The red and blue-stained areas represent the contractile apparatus, the muscles that keep the heart beating strong.

Zebrafish are useful experimental animals: their genome has been fully sequenced, their bodies are transparent, and their developing embryos are fairly robust. Even more impressively, their hearts have the ability to regenerate after damage. Zebrafish can lose up to 20 per cent of their heart muscle without long-term consequences, as they can repair the damage completely within eight weeks.

Adult mammals lack this superpower. Although some newborn mammals can regenerate damaged heart tissue, this ability vanishes as they mature. During a heart attack, heart muscle cells are deprived of oxygen and they die, leaving scar tissue. “Understanding how zebrafish regenerate [their heart] may one day help victims of heart attacks recover,” says Jana Koth of the BHF Centre of Research Excellence at Oxford University , who took the photograph.

Women in science: How can we plug the leaking pipeline? - 05 June 2013 - New Scientist

Baby dinos pumped their muscles inside the egg

Jun 4

Lemon Shark: Sac to “Stem” 

Shown about halfway through its 12-month gestation period in a computer-generated illustration, a lemon shark—like a human embryo—is literally connected to its mother via an umbilical cord attached to a placenta. But it wasn’t always so.

Until about three months in the womb, baby sharks feed off a yolk sac. Once the embryo has depleted the yolk, the collapsed sac settles against the womb wall and shoots blood vessels into the wall, tapping into the mother’s circulatory system.

By the time the embryo is six months old (pictured), it has a sense of smell 10,000 times sharper than a human’s. This and other sensory adaptations—including electro-sensors that detect the faint voltage of other animals—will one day allow the shark to detect even a fin flick hundreds of feet away, according to the National Geographic documentary In the Womb: Extreme Animals.

From the National Geographic (US) and Channel 4 (UK) Documentary Animals in the womb.

Jun 2

The Brains of the Animal Kingdom - WSJ.com

fuckyeahneuroscience:

New research shows that we have grossly underestimated both the scope and the scale of animal intelligence. Primatologist Frans de Waal on memory-champ chimps, tool-using elephants and rats capable of empathy.

Who is smarter: a person or an ape? Well, it depends on the task. Consider Ayumu, a young male chimpanzee at Kyoto University who, in a 2007 study, put human memory to shame. Trained on a touch screen, Ayumu could recall a random series of nine numbers, from 1 to 9, and tap them in the right order, even though the numbers had been displayed for just a fraction of a second and then replaced with white squares.

I tried the task myself and could not keep track of more than five numbers—and I was given much more time than the brainy ape. In the study, Ayumu outperformed a group of university students by a wide margin. The next year, he took on the British memory champion Ben Pridmore and emerged the “chimpion.”

How do you give a chimp—or an elephant or an octopus or a horse—an IQ test? It may sound like the setup to a joke, but it is actually one of the thorniest questions facing science today. Over the past decade, researchers on animal cognition have come up with some ingenious solutions to the testing problem. Their findings have started to upend a view of humankind’s unique place in the universe that dates back at least to ancient Greece.