Oh Yeah, Developmental Biology!

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Posts tagged with "fish"

ohyeahdevelopmentalbiology:

what do you call a fish without eyes?

Follicle-stimulating hormone

Still funny


For people worried about the feminising effect of oestrogen-like chemicals in the water there is now a modern-day equivalent of the canary in the coal mine: a genetically modified fish in a bowl.
Male fish exposed to oestrogen have delayed sperm development and grow smaller testes. Some industrial chemicals, such as bisphenol A, mimic oestrogen, but little is known about how the effects of different oestrogen-like chemicals add up in water.
To find out, Xueping Chen and colleagues at Vitargent, a biotechnology company in Hong Kong, have created a genetically engineered fish that glows green when it is exposed to oestrogen-like chemicals. Chen’s team took the green fluorescent protein gene from jellyfish and spliced it into the genome of the medaka fish, Oryzias melastigma, next to a gene that detects oestrogen. Chemicals that have oestrogen-like activity cause the fish to express the modified gene, making them glow.
When the team tested the fish at eight sites around Hong Kong, they found that some chemicals that showed weak or no oestrogenic activity, including UV filters used in sunscreen, had combined in water to amplify or create an oestrogenic effect. The work is as yet unpublished.
William Price of the University of Wollongong in New South Wales, Australia, warns the approach does not detect a biological response.

For people worried about the feminising effect of oestrogen-like chemicals in the water there is now a modern-day equivalent of the canary in the coal mine: a genetically modified fish in a bowl.

Male fish exposed to oestrogen have delayed sperm development and grow smaller testes. Some industrial chemicals, such as bisphenol A, mimic oestrogen, but little is known about how the effects of different oestrogen-like chemicals add up in water.

To find out, Xueping Chen and colleagues at Vitargent, a biotechnology company in Hong Kong, have created a genetically engineered fish that glows green when it is exposed to oestrogen-like chemicals. Chen’s team took the green fluorescent protein gene from jellyfish and spliced it into the genome of the medaka fish, Oryzias melastigma, next to a gene that detects oestrogen. Chemicals that have oestrogen-like activity cause the fish to express the modified gene, making them glow.

When the team tested the fish at eight sites around Hong Kong, they found that some chemicals that showed weak or no oestrogenic activity, including UV filters used in sunscreen, had combined in water to amplify or create an oestrogenic effect. The work is as yet unpublished.

William Price of the University of Wollongong in New South Wales, Australia, warns the approach does not detect a biological response.

Jun 7
Anglerfish ovary

Anglerfish ovary

Zoologger: The only fish that cries like a baby

The three-spined toadfish looks as hard as a rock. In fact, you might well mistake it for one. With its fat head and wide, high-set eyes, it likes to lurk camouflaged on the floor of swamps. But under pressure, the fish’s behaviour is rather more spineless than its name suggests – it’s the only fish known to cry like a baby.

It’s not the only fish that can make a noise, however. Herring use high-pitched farts to find each other in the dark, and clown fish clack their jaws together as a warning to intruders.

Article

May 5

Anatomical clues to human evolution from fish

Your face is your most expressive feature; it tells the world what you are feeling, who you are and where you come from. Although no two faces are exactly the same, they share a number of common characteristics; a couple of eyes, a nose, a mouth and a philtrum.

The philtrum is the groove on your top lip that lies just beneath your nose. You see it every day in the mirror so you probably never think about it

It has no obvious function. Instead it is an accident of our origins, a clue to our fishy past and how our faces first formed

Full Story

what do you call a fish without eyes?

Follicle-stimulating hormone

I actually laughed :D Biology jokes are the best :)

Evolution of the Recurrent laryngeal Nerve - proof of common descent (via LithodidMan)

Following on from the previous post, this video shows the evolution of the Laryngeal nerve in fish. 

evolutionary Development of fish to tetrapod. Shows Skull morphology with Tiktaalik Roseae have intermediate forms and proving itself the missing link. 
via www.earthhistory.org.uk

evolutionary Development of fish to tetrapod. Shows Skull morphology with Tiktaalik Roseae have intermediate forms and proving itself the missing link.

via www.earthhistory.org.uk

A New Approach to Earth History » Tiktaalik roseae – a missing link?

'The missing link from sea to land.'