Oh Yeah, Developmental Biology!

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Apr 2

Framed: The tumour that killed  Dolly the sheep
(Image: Henny Martineau/Moredun Research Institute)Call  it CSI: Farmyard. This image of an early-stage tumour nodule  (shown green) in the lung of a sheep may throw new light on the disease  that killed the  most famous of sheep of modern times, Dolly. Ovine pulmonary adenocarcinoma (OPA) is an infectious form of  cancer that is usually present in 2 to 3 per cent of a flock, but can  affect up to up to 30 per cent of those carrying the disease. OPA  develops when sheep become infected by the Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus  but the precise mechanisms behind the development of the disease are yet  to be fully understood. By studying OPA researchers hope to  improve our understanding of the development of the cancer.  The results  are also relevant to human lung cancer for which samples of early stage  tumour growth are difficult to obtain.  

Original Journal
New Scientist Article

Framed: The tumour that killed Dolly the sheep

(Image: Henny Martineau/Moredun Research Institute)

Call it CSI: Farmyard. This image of an early-stage tumour nodule (shown green) in the lung of a sheep may throw new light on the disease that killed the most famous of sheep of modern times, Dolly.

Ovine pulmonary adenocarcinoma (OPA) is an infectious form of cancer that is usually present in 2 to 3 per cent of a flock, but can affect up to up to 30 per cent of those carrying the disease. OPA develops when sheep become infected by the Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus but the precise mechanisms behind the development of the disease are yet to be fully understood.

By studying OPA researchers hope to improve our understanding of the development of the cancer.  The results are also relevant to human lung cancer for which samples of early stage tumour growth are difficult to obtain. 

Original Journal

New Scientist Article