Oh Yeah, Developmental Biology!

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Embryon: Human Embryogenesis

embryonblog:

Hey everyone!

Our indiegogo campaign is launched.

Please share with anyone interested in science, medical art, embryology, dental, education, or anyone you think would like to see what we’re doing.

Thanks!

ladylover007:

Tarchia & Tarbosaurus in the Hwaseong City Hall 1

©Hang-jae Lee

I start college in August, and I wanted to know if you have any tips for new biology majors?

Yes. Be prepared to study hard and party hard :D

9am lectures are the worst, so buy a Dictaphone as you will fall asleep at some point and trying to decipher sleep written notes at a later date will have you thinking you work at Bletchley Park. 

But on a more serious note, new scientist is a good place for general articles. Get you books second hand off various sites or on offers posted round uni. This will save you a fortune!! 

Join your biology (life science/whatever its called) society. 

Generally just be social and have fun :D science is fun after all :) 

I’m sure people will have more advice to add so check the notes.

Jul 2
Rainbow ‘bird’s nest’ MRI reveals how a heart beats

(Image: Laurence Jackson)
This is not a colourful bird’s nest: it is the collection of muscle fibres that work together to make a mouse heart beat.
The vivid MRI picture was captured using diffusion tensor imaging, which tracks the movement of fluid through tissue, using different colours to represent the orientation of the strands.
The fibres, which spiral around the left ventricular cavity, curve in different directions around the inside and outside walls of the chamber. When the fibres pull against one another, the result is an upwards twisting motion that forces blood to be pumped out.
The image, which was the overall winner of the Research Images as Artcompetition at University College London last year, is currently on display at the Summer Science Exhibition taking place at the Royal Society in London. It is part of an exhibit showcasing future imaging techniques that will allow us to peer inside the body.

Rainbow ‘bird’s nest’ MRI reveals how a heart beats

(Image: Laurence Jackson)

This is not a colourful bird’s nest: it is the collection of muscle fibres that work together to make a mouse heart beat.

The vivid MRI picture was captured using diffusion tensor imaging, which tracks the movement of fluid through tissue, using different colours to represent the orientation of the strands.

The fibres, which spiral around the left ventricular cavity, curve in different directions around the inside and outside walls of the chamber. When the fibres pull against one another, the result is an upwards twisting motion that forces blood to be pumped out.

The image, which was the overall winner of the Research Images as Artcompetition at University College London last year, is currently on display at the Summer Science Exhibition taking place at the Royal Society in London. It is part of an exhibit showcasing future imaging techniques that will allow us to peer inside the body.

forever—eli:

Embryology my favorite class ever😍

forever—eli:

Embryology my favorite class ever😍

This is a filtered confocal image of a stage1 Drosophila melanogaster egg chamber budding out of the germarium. The germarium is the assembly line for new egg chambers; it houses the germline stem cells which develop into mature egg chambers during oogenesis. The germarium, the budding stage 1 egg chamber, and the more mature stage 2 egg chamber were stained for mitochondria using an anti-ATPSythase antibody (green). Mitochondria are the powerhouse of the cell and provide the energy required for growth and maturation during oogenesis.

This is a filtered confocal image of a stage1 Drosophila melanogaster egg chamber budding out of the germarium. The germarium is the assembly line for new egg chambers; it houses the germline stem cells which develop into mature egg chambers during oogenesis. The germarium, the budding stage 1 egg chamber, and the more mature stage 2 egg chamber were stained for mitochondria using an anti-ATPSythase antibody (green). Mitochondria are the powerhouse of the cell and provide the energy required for growth and maturation during oogenesis.

Aug 1

paleontologue:

In 1905, E. G. Conklin published a remarkable fate map of the ascidian embryo. He showed that “all the principle organs of the larva in their definitive positions and proportions are here marked out in the 2-cell stage by distinct kinds of protoplasm.” This study of cell lineage has been the basis for all subsequent research on the autonomous specification of tunicates. The color plates of this study are considered to be some of the best examples of embryological illustration and descriptive anatomy.

scienceyoucanlove:

CALICO DOG MAY BE A CHIMERA

A photograph of a dog at a veterinary hospital has gone viral this week because of the animal’s unusual but beautiful markings. The Labrador Retriever, Bull, has a coat colored like that of a calico cat. He is a patient at Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, according to MSN Now.

Because of Bull’s unique coat, he is suspected of being a chimera, a single animal that genetically is two animals, i.e., an individual that is its own twin. Bull, then, appears to be a chimera that is both black Lab and yellow Lab.

We saw this phenomenon last summer when a "two-faced" calico chimera cat named Venus caught the Internet’s attention. Bull has emerged as Venus’ canine counterpart, albeit without the same dead-even color split down the middle of his face.

Whether Bull is a chimera hasn’t been confirmed medically yet, but we’ll watch the veterinary hospital’s Facebook page to see if they post any further information and, hopefully, more photos of this interesting dog.

source


What is a chimera?

A chimera is typically formed from four parent cells (either two fertilized eggs, or two early embryos that have fused together).When the organism forms, the cells that had already begun to develop in the separate embryos keep their original phenotypes and appearances — resulting in a two-faced cat like Venus. (see second picture)

It can happen to humans too. In 1953 a human chimera was reported in the British Medical Journal. A woman was found to have blood containing two different blood types that apparently resulted from cells from her twin brother living in her body. Other such instances have been reported in the decade since.

source

Heart, heal thyself! No problem, says the zebrafish

(Image: BHF/Dr Jana Koth)image

The future of regenerative medicine is bright: in this case, literally. This image of a stained zebrafish heart glowing with multiple colours is one of the winners of the British Heart Foundation’s annual heart and blood vessel photography competition.

The green staining of the two-day-old heart highlights the cardiomyocytes, the cells of the heart muscle itself. The red and blue-stained areas represent the contractile apparatus, the muscles that keep the heart beating strong.

Zebrafish are useful experimental animals: their genome has been fully sequenced, their bodies are transparent, and their developing embryos are fairly robust. Even more impressively, their hearts have the ability to regenerate after damage. Zebrafish can lose up to 20 per cent of their heart muscle without long-term consequences, as they can repair the damage completely within eight weeks.

Adult mammals lack this superpower. Although some newborn mammals can regenerate damaged heart tissue, this ability vanishes as they mature. During a heart attack, heart muscle cells are deprived of oxygen and they die, leaving scar tissue. “Understanding how zebrafish regenerate [their heart] may one day help victims of heart attacks recover,” says Jana Koth of the BHF Centre of Research Excellence at Oxford University , who took the photograph.

Dinosaurs, Fruit Flies, and Us

lcresearchcenter:

image

July 26th, 2013

There have been revolutionary advances in our knowledge of genetics in the past 30 years. This is particularly true in a field of endeavor called developmental genetics, which strives to understand how genes work to put us together. To make a baby that grows and eventually makes its own babies.

We have found that genes which coordinate development in the fruit fly are similar in structure, function, expression, and genomic organization to genes in human beings (i.e., how they are arranged on chromosomes, what regulates them and how they interact with each other). Yet fruit flies are not like us: among other obvious differences they have wings and we don’t (even if we wish we did!).

The formation of wings or legs or a segmented abdomen or hundreds of other steps are all part of a genetically specified developmental program leading to a body plan, a process which is called pattern formation. The revolution in part is the understanding of the degree of conservation of the genes responsible across huge phylogenetic chasms. In other words the degree to which the genes are the same even though we evolved into different animals almost a hundred million years ago.

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